Malegaon to have common fabric processing facility


Powerloom owners in textile cluster of Malegaon in western Indian state of Maharashtra are in the process of setting up their own facility to process fabrics. The new facility would be the first government sponsored Common Facility Centre (CFC) in Nashik district.

Malegaon currently has two privately-owned process centres with a capacity to process a maximum of 250,000 metres of cloth per day, which is very small compared to an estimated production of about 10 million metres of grey cloth every day.

So far, around 70 percent of grey poplin manufactured in Malegaon was sent to process houses in Balotra and Pali in Rajasthan. But, a court order in February this year banned textile process houses in these two towns from discharging waste water and effluents into the Luni river.

The Rajasthan High Court asked the process house owners to install plants for treating waste water before they are again allowed to begin their operations. The court order resulted in closure of several process houses in Balotra. 

To ease the situation for Malegaon powerloom owners, Dr. Baliram Hirey Hi-Tech Textile Cluster Services Pvt Ltd. is setting up the CFC, which will have a fully automatic and hi-tech process house. It will provide pre-weaving and post-weaving industrial assistance to the powerloom weavers.

Mr. Prakash Kankaria, Director of Dr. Baliram Hiray Hi-Tech Textile Cluster Services, told fibre2fashion, “We are installing a CFC sanctioned by the Government of India. In the CFC, we are going to install wet processors for bleaching, mercerization, etc.”

Apprising about current situation in Malegaon, he says, “There are around 200,000 traditional powerlooms in Malegaon which manufacture around 10 million metres of cloth per day, but the town does not have adequate facilities for pre-weaving and post-weaving treatments. There is also a lack of technical support.”

“Currently, we are installing automatic machines for various processes and then we will be installing the process house. This will enable us to produce fabric that is ready for dyeing,” he states.

The CFC is being established with an investment of Rs. 158.4 million. The Central Government is funding 80 percent of the capital and the state government is contributing another 10 percent.

“Our stake in the CFC project is 10 percent. We are 15 member companies and we have around 2 acres of our own land on which we are setting up the CFC,” he informs.

“The project will take at least one year to be completed and become operational. The members will provide their fabric and get it processed on job basis. This will help the powerloom industry to bloom in and around the town,” he opines.

“Currently, very low grade quality cloth is produced in Malegaon. So, the CFC would also act as a catalyst for upgrading the quality of the cloth from 50 GSM to 200 GSM. Companies can also take up manufacturing of denim fabrics, suiting, shirting, etc.,” he avers. 

5 textile processing units dismantled


Erode, Apr18 (PTI): Five textile dyeing and printing units in Periyasemur area on the outskirts of the city have been dismantled by the District Environmental Monitoring Committee for allegedly discharing untreated effluents into water sources and for operating without proper licence. Committee members raided the units yesterday and found them discharging untreated toxic effluent into water sources. They also found none of the five factories had obtained licences or permission of Pollution Control Board. Two units have obtained power supply by producing false records, officials said. The factories were dismantled and the power supply disconnected. Pollution Control Board personnel said they would take action against the factory owners. They said they have dismantled 119 such factories in and around Erode in the last five months for operating without any license.

 

SOURCE: IBN LIVE

Pawar writes to PM, criticises curbs on exports


New Delhi: Irked by curbs on milk, cotton and sugar exports, Agriculture Minister Sharad Pawar has shot off a letter to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh stating that the government’s policies are hurting farmers who are being asked to subsidise the industry.

Pawar wrote to the Prime Minister on Tuesday, a day after group of ministers disallowed cotton export beyond 13 million bales for the current marketing year.

He strongly criticised Food Ministry headed by KV Thomas and the Textile Ministry under the charge of Anand Sharma for the policies which are “ambivalent” and go against farmers.

Pawar writes to PM, criticises curbs on exports

Describing restriction on cotton exports as “retrograde”, the NCP chief said: “Indian cotton farmers should not be asked to bear the burden of subsidising the textile mills.

“Compromising the interest of small cotton farmers to benefit the textile magnates is indeed a travesty of justice. Moreover, it defies logic to permit the consumer of cotton (textile industry) to dictate terms to cotton producer…”.

Similarly, he said the “negative approach” of the Food Department in allowing sugar exports has led to heavy losses in export earnings which could have been used to clear cane arrears to farmers that have crossed Rs 8,000 crore.

Pawar told the Prime Minister, “On numerous occasions I have discussed with you the need to have farmer-centric agriculture policy…On each of these occasions; I have found you in consonance with these ideas.

“However, despite this our government has time and again taken decision which goes against the interest of the farming community and adversely impacts its growth and stability”.

High input cost and low realisation from his produce has pushed the farmer into a corner where he fights for his survival, he said, underscoring the need for a free trade regime to ensure remunerative prices to farmers.

Besides Pawar, the cotton exports ban has also been opposed Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi and Congress party’s Maharashtra and Gujarat units.

On sugar exports, Pawar said, “The negativity prevalent in the Department (of Food) regarding sugar exports can best gauged from the fact that though the decision to allow sugar exports of 10 lakh tonnes was taken on March 26, 2012, no orders regarding the same have been issued till date.”

He pointed out that the Food Department is yet to come out with any methodology to expedite sugar exports despite direction of the Empowered Group of Ministers to do away with the quota system of allocating export quantity among mills.

“We must learn from the mistake of 2006-07 and 2007-08, when we spent Rs 1,500 crore on export and buffer subsidy to bail out the sugar industry and provide succor to the sugarcane farmers,” Pawar warned.

In view of higher domestic output, the government has allowed export of 30 lakh tonnes in three equal tranches for this year. The food ministry is yet to notify the export decision for third tranche.

Pawar said that the Centre’s policy towards milk and milk products has been “equally ambivalent” and demanded opening of export of skimmed milk powder and casein.

In the letter, Pawar has highlighted that the country has produced record production of foodgrains, cotton, sugarcane and oilseeds despite rising input costs.

“For the government’s MSP (minimum support price) to cover all the costs is well nigh impossible and it is thus necessary for us to allow a free market and trade regime to ensure remunerative prices to the farmers,” he explained.

Stating that there is relentless pressure on farm sector to produce more, Pawar said, “It is imperative that we do not stymie the growth of our agriculture sector by policies which further worsen the returns to the Indian farmers.”

‘Response to textile policy good’ – M’shtra state official



“The response is very good but implementation of the new textile policy will naturally take some time”, said a top official of the Maharashtra Textiles Ministry. 

“The policy is just announced. It will take time for the projects to get finalized”, informed Mr Sunil Porwal, Principal Secretary in the Textiles Ministry of state of Maharashtra. 

Mr Porwal was responding to queries from fibre2fashion, regarding the response to the recently announced new textile policy announced by Maharashtra. 

The Maharashtra government had recently announced a new textile policy, which aims to attract Rs 400 billion in investment and generate 1.1 million new jobs over the next five years. 

Mr Porwal added, “It requires time to get projects approved from banks and since the industry is not going through a good time, banks are reluctant to give loans”. 

The other main objective of the policy was to set up a farm to industry cotton value-chain, in order to rejuvenate the cotton regions in the state. 

The new policy envisages setting up of textile units in the cotton growing regions of Vidarbha, Marathawada and northern Maharashtra. 

 

Textiles key sector in India’s new manufacturing policy


The Indian textile sector has been identified as a key-labour intensive industry in the National Manufacturing Policy. The new manufacturing policy came in to effect three months back and was being debated and discussed since the last 18 months. 

The National Manufacturing Policy envisages precisely a 14 percent annual growth rate in the overall production sector for the next 10 years. Alongside it also envisions, generating 100 million manufacturing jobs in the same period.

“The textile industry is a labour-intensive industry which the policy has recognized as a focus area, Mr. Ajay Shankar, Member Secretary of the National Manufacturing Competitiveness Council (NMCC) told fibre2fashion.

He added, “We have a vision for its growth to take off the way we want it to take off so, we need to work together to address the short term problems which the industry is facing”.

“To ensure the growth rate is achieved under the circumstances, we need to first work out what is possible and then target those growth rates”, he revealed.

Providing details about the new policy, he said, “The National Manufacturing Policy aims strictly at success in manufacturing. It aims at precisely 14% growth rate for the next 10 years and create 100 million jobs in manufacturing sector. 

“The policy constitutes a very comprehensive strategy and there are certain points which need to be addressed. One element which is very important is the skill mission so that there are enough people with employable skills, so that the availability of skilled manpower is ahead of the jobs in terms of demand rather than being behind them. With this view the skill mission has been launched. 

“Another key element is that we must have industrial land available readily at feasible prices. This we will ensure in partnership with the state governments. The policy also envisages the creation of the National Industrial Manufacturing Zones which will be spread around an area of about 5,000 hectares. 

“It will be developed as Industrial Manufacturing Zones and then there will be an entire ecosystem for manufacturing in these areas which is large enough and has world class infrastructure”, he concluded by informing. 

Swisstex California becomes bluesign system partner


Swisstex California Inc., an industry leader in dyeing and finishing for knit fabrics since 1996, has announced that it has become a bluesign system partner.

The Los Angeles, California-based company said the partnership with bluesign will enable it to provide a healthier and more successful textile future.

Besides further minimizing its negative impact on the environment, Swisstex is also replacing its existing dyeing machines with new state-of-the-art models as a part of its modernization plan.

Thomas Schrieder, President of Swisstex, said the company did everything possible to reduce its harmful impact on the environment, but still there was a missing link which has now been filled with bluesign certification.

He added that the bluesign system partnership will give Swisstex access to tools that were previously unavailable, and thus help the firm choose the input items that would have the least negative impact on the environment.

The bluesign standard puts a reliable and proactive tool at the disposal of the entire textile production chain from raw material and component suppliers who manufacture yarns and dyes, to textile manufacturers, to retailers and brand companies, to consumers.

It combines all aspects of occupational health, air and water emissions as well as consumer safety in a single standard under the general objective of resource productivity.